3 more California cities considering breed specific MSN

Earlier this month, we learned that the Ventura County Animal Services Commission approved a mandatory spay/neuter proposal that would apply only to “pit bulls”. That proposal was sent to city governments and county leaders for consideration. The original alert can be found here.

At the time the alert was issued, we were only aware that Simi Valley, Oxnard and Ventura were actively considering the ordinance. It appears that 3 more cities can be added to that list: Port Hueneme, Moorpark and Camarillo.

Please contact the city officials of Port Hueneme, Moorpark and Camarillo with your polite, respectful and informative opposition to BSL. In addition, please continue to contact the cities of Ventura, Oxnard and Simi Valley, and encourage the officials of all these cities to seek a solution that does not single out one breed of dog. Suggested alternatives can be found here.

Regardless of your position on spaying and neutering of pets, it is important to remember that any law that applies to one breed or grouping of dogs involves the practice of breed profiling and is breed specific legislation. Breed specific MSN is fraught with the many problems associated with BSL, and opens the door for future additional breed restrictions.

City of Port Hueneme, California
Council the entire council:
councilwebmail@ci.port-hueneme.ca.us

The Port Hueneme City Council holds regular meetings on the First and Third Mondays of the month at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers at City Hall.

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City of Moorpark, CA
799 Moorpark Avenue
Moorpark, California 93021
(805) 517-6200
Fax (805) 532-2205
General Email: moorpark@ci.moorpark.ca.us

The Mayor and City Council members may be reached by e-mail as a group at citycouncil@ci.moorpark.ca.us, individually (listed below), or by phone at 805.517.6222

Mayor and City Council:
jparvin@ci.moorpark.ca.us,dpollock@ci.moorpark.ca.us,rmikos@ci.moorpark.ca.us,kmillhouse@ci.moorpark.ca.us,mvandam@ci.moorpark.ca.us

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City of Camarillo, CA
council@ci.camarillo.ca.us

The City Council generally meets on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month in the Council Chambers located at city hall at 601 Carmen Drive, Camarillo. The meetings begin at 5:00 p.m. Public Comments on items not on the agenda are heard at 7:30 p.m

Camarillo council endorses idea of pit bull spay and neuter law
By Adam Foxman
Ventura County Star
•Posted March 29, 2012

The a.inline_topic:hover { background-color: #EAEAEA; } Camarillo City Council on Wednesday night endorsed the concept of a proposed ordinance that would require the spaying or neutering of most pit bulls as a way to reduce the number of dogs euthanized in the county.

Saying it has too many pit bulls in its shelter, Ventura County Animal Services is asking cities to consider the proposal, which would exempt show dogs and those with health problems. Pit bulls account for about 20 percent of the dogs at the county’s Camarillo shelter, and 58 percent are put down because they aren’t adopted, statistics show.

“Everybody wants us to be a no-kill shelter, and we really can’t be a no-kill shelter when we’re looking at, particularly, our pit bulls,” Animal Services Director Monica Nolan said in an interview this week. “Only 8 percent of those get adopted.”

The Camarillo council voted 4-1 to indicate an interest in considering a mandatory spay and neuter proposal but did not adopt the proposed ordinance or call for a new one to be prepared.

County officials had asked cities to comment on the proposal before an April meeting of the county Animal Services Commission.

Councilman Don Waunch dissented.

“I would hate to pick on the one breed,” he said. “If I were going to do this, I’d do it like some of the other counties I’ve checked into and do them all — all breeds.”

Councilman Kevin Kildee said the bottom line is the low adoption rate for pit bulls.

Nolan said the single-breed mandate is needed because voluntary spay and neuter programs haven’t worked for pit bulls as they have for other kinds of dogs.

The county shelter offered breaks on fines to owners of pit bulls picked up as strays if they would let authorities to spay or neuter their dogs free, and 10 percent accepted, Nolan said. A $10 spay and neuter program run by Valley Veterinary Clinic in Simi Valley also enticed few pit bull owners, she said.

“What we’re really saying is we need the stick with the carrot,” Nolan said.

She added that she thinks many pit bull owners want tough-looking guard dogs that are not neutered. Because all animals at the shelter are spayed or neutered, she believes that’s one reason they don’t get adopted.

Nolan said neutering helps reduce aggression in male dogs without decreasing their guarding instinct.

The resistance of many pit bull owners to sterilization may be contributing to the overpopulation problem, as people breed dogs to sell and unsterilized pets run loose, Nolan said.

San Bernardino, San Francisco and Sonoma counties have adopted spay and neuter ordinances to stem the increasing number of pit bulls in shelters, officials said.

The ordinance proposed by Ventura County would exempt purebred pit bulls registered with organizations such as the American Kennel Club, show dogs, animals used by police and those that cannot be spayed or neutered because of health conditions.

Pit bull owners who don’t comply with the law could face fines of up to $100, Nolan said. At low-cost clinics or through license vouchers, spaying or neutering a dog or cat costs about $65. There also is a hardship clause to help people who can’t afford the procedure.

The proposal has drawn various reactions from city councils in the county. Ventura’s council expressed support, Simi Valley’s postponed a decision to gather more information, Port Hueneme’s agreed with some parts of the proposal, Moorpark’s plans to consider it, and Oxnard’s plans to hold a public forum, according to Animal Services.

Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/mar/29/camarillo-council-interested-in-proposed-pit-and/#ixzz1qYaGSZxM
– vcstar.com

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